EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOPS

To ensure participants get the most out of this year’s conference, we have developed tracks with our educational sessions that focus on History, Preservation, Conservation, Education, and Heritage Tourism. The Track each session is associated with is listed under the title for that session.

10:45 am-11:45 am Educational Workshops

Closing Ranks: Protecting Cultural and Natural Resources on Battlefields

Preservation Track

The NPS American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP) promotes the preservation of historic battlefields associated with wars fought on American soil. Not in decades have battlefield landscapes been more in the spotlight than in the past five years. Yet, battlefields are rapidly disappearing as incompatible development and natural threats engulf the landscapes. Without battlefield landscapes, the character of the American countryside, urban areas, and natural habitats degrades. This workshop will explore the challenges of battlefield preservation and examine the best practices of integrating natural resource conservation and cultural landscape preservation, as well as how to keep the protection of these landscapes relevant to a changing national demographic. Examples from battlefields within the JTHG Heritage Area will be highlighted.

Presenters:

  • Elizabeth S. Vehmeyer, Archeologist, NPS American Battlefield Protection Program
  • Kristen L. McMasters, Archeologist and Grants Manager, NPS American Battlefield Protection Program

Better Walking and Bicycling on the JTHG’s Scenic Byways and Main Streets: A More Sustainable Travel Experience

Conservation Track, Heritage Tourism Track

More and more heritage travelers are reaching their destination without a car. How can JTHG communities provide better access to heritage-based travel experiences for those that choose to travel without one? Increasing bicycle and pedestrian access to a heritage area’s sites and destinations—with their highly sensitive historic context—requires a different mindset than just providing bicycle lanes and itineraries. The workshop will provide information about best practices for increasing bicycle and pedestrian access to the JTHG’s heritage sites, Main Street communities, scenic byways, and state and national parks without destroying the distinctive character that attracts heritage travelers in the first place.

Presenter:

  • Jim Klein, ASLA, Lardner/Klein Landscape Architects, PC

Shillings, Kernels, Pounds and Miles: Using Historic Events, Sites and Landscapes to Teach Science and Math

Education Track

History teachers often shy away from STEM-based learning, when in reality, math and science pervades every aspect of history. This workshop will highlight a variety of metrics—including currencies, weights and measures, crop yields, and the speeds of animals—as examples of how to use eighteenth-century values when addressing and understanding twenty-first-century issues, such as the American War of Independence. By using models like the march of allied forces to Yorktown, including Anthony Wayne’s troop movements through the JTHG region in the summer of 1781, attendees will learn both US history and hone their mathematical skills.

Presenter:

  • Robert A Selig, Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Association Inc.

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm Educational Workshops

Freedmen’s Bureau Schools in the JTHG Region

History Track

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands was created by Congress in March of 1865 to assist formerly enslaved African Americans transition to a life of freedom. More commonly known as the Freedmen’s Bureau, the agency was particularly effective in creating new educational opportunities for African Americans throughout the South. In collaboration with missionary and aid societies in the North, the Freedmen’s Bureau provided buildings, teachers, and materials to establish schools, and encouraged African American communities to both take advantage of the opportunity and to assist in maintaining the schools. By 1870, over 1,000 schools had been funded through the Freedmen’s Bureau. This workshop will discuss three extant Freedmen’s Bureau schools in the JTHG region – in Loudoun County, VA; Jefferson County, WV; and Washington County, MD – and spark a conversation among workshop participants on appropriate ways to interpret these historic sites.

Presenter:

  • Dean Herrin, Chief Historian of the National Capital Region of the National Park Service

Saving Places through Coalition Advocacy: The James River at Jamestown Case Study

Preservation Track

Sometimes taking direct action is the best way to preserve a historic place. The campaign to save the historic, scenic, and natural landscape at the James River near Jamestown (one of the most historically significant landscapes in the United States) from a destructive transmission line is a great case study to teach attendees how to create a coalition, develop community outreach plans, refine press messaging, and use available legal processes to help save important places.

Presenters:

  • Sharee Williamson, Associate General Counsel, National Trust for Historic Preservation
  • Rob Nieweg, Senior Field Director & Attorney, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Bringing History Alive: Using Beacon Based Apps to Engage Your Visitors

Education Track, Heritage Tourism Track

As historic sites work to create more engaging opportunities for visitors, two sites within the JTHG National Heritage Area—Monticello and Harpers Ferry National Historical Park—have independently developed new interpretive tour options. Through the use of location-specific beacons, both sites are incorporating technology, while encouraging their users to interact with the site in new and exciting ways!

Moderator:

Jessie Aucoin, Director of Educational Programs, JTHG Partnership

Presenters:

  • Avery Chenoweth, Founder/CEO, Here’s My Story
  • Autumn Cook, Web Manager and Social Media Specialist, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
  • Dennis Frye, Chief of Interpretation, Education & Partnerships, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
  • Linnea Grim, Director of Education & Visitor Programs, Monticello

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm Educational Workshops

Guiding Genealogists When You Don’t Know Anything About Genealogy

History Track

Genealogists are an important component of Heritage Tourism. Front-line hospitality and tourism personnel are frequently asked to offer genealogy research advice, which is a topic they may know little about. While genealogy can be a complicated research process, there are basic tips and methodology guidelines that can assist anyone guiding the genealogists standing in front of them. This session will help attendees identify several major genealogy collections located within The Journey, as well as the role of other important resources, such as libraries, archives, courthouses and historical societies.

Presenters:

  • Mary Mannix, Maryland Room Manager, Frederick County Public Libraries
  • Laura E. Christiansen, Curator of Manuscripts and Archives, The Thomas Balch Library

 

The Canal Quarters Program: Preserving Historic Structures for Use as Interpretive Tools

Preservation Track, Heritage Tourism Track

The Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Trust’s Canal Quarters program has won numerous preservation awards in recognition of its unique approach to the creative reuse of historic lockhouses. Six lockhouses have been preserved and opened up to overnight guests, with each interpreting a different period of Canal history. This session will discuss the process of preserving the lockhouses, how the program works, how we balance twenty-first-century requirements with historic authenticity, and the opportunities and challenges encountered. Join this session to spark ideas for creative reuse of historic buildings and get a sneak peak at the seventh lockhouse currently being rehabbed. This session has been sponsored by the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works

Presenters:

  • Heidi Glatfelter Schlag, Director of Communications, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Trust

Hacking Hallowed Ground: Lessons Learned

Education Track, Heritage Tourism Track

In October 2015, the Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area invited representatives of battlefields, museums and historic sites to participate in a millennial engagement workshop led by Museum Hack, a group known for using radical interpretive techniques to get people excited about museums. This high energy, technology-infused program explored new ways to incorporate inquiry, storytelling, movement, tour guide swaps, photo challenges, power moves, and a little sass to shake up the traditional museum or battlefield visit. Panelists will reflect on lessons learned and how heritage area resources might (or might not) incorporate hack techniques into their interpretive plans. This session will include Q&A, and an interactive Museum Hack game, an easy, lively, and fun activity that all participants can adapt to use at their location. Are we ready to embrace Museum Hack on Hallowed Ground? Join this session to find out!

Moderator:

  • Elizabeth Scott Shatto, Executive Director, Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area

Presenters:

  • Auni Gelles, Assistant Director, Heart of the Civil War Heritage
  • AreaBeth Parnicza, Park Historian, Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park
  • National Museum of Civil War Representative
  • Museum Hack Representative

Walking Tour of Downtown Hagerstown

Preservation Track

Explore downtown Hagerstown by foot on this exciting guided walking tour. Learn the history of Hagerstown, from founding in 1739 by Jonathan Hager, to the Civil War and its strategic location at the border between North and South, through to modern day.

Tour Guide:

  • Tour Guide

3:45 pm – 4:45 pm Closing Session

The Next 50 Years: Defining Preservation for the 21st-Century

Preservation Track

From a grassroots movement to a professional field defined by the 1966 National Historic Preservation Act, historic preservation has evolved into a set of processes, rules & regulations. But why do we preserve? Why is preservation worthy of broad community support? The answers to these questions have varied depending on the speaker, the audience and current issues. In December of 2015, the Morven Park Preservation Forum concluded a two-year initiative that resulted in a clear mission statement and a set of core values to guide the field of preservation. This session will present the findings of the Forum and engage the audience in a discussion on the future of preservation.

Presenter:

  • Jana Shafagoj, Director of Preservation & Education, Morven Park

Conference schedule subject to change. Please check back for updates.